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The smartest building in the world – The Edge

The smartest building in the world – The Edge

Inside the connected future of architecture

It knows where you live. It knows what car you drive. It knows who you’re meeting with today and how much sugar you take in your coffee. (At least it will, after the next software update.) This is the Edge, and it’s quite possibly the smartest office space ever constructed.

A day at the Edge in Amsterdam starts with a smartphone app developed with the building’s main tenant, consulting firm Deloitte. From the minute you wake up, you’re connected. The app checks your schedule, and the building recognizes your car when you arrive and directs you to a parking spot.

Then the app finds you a desk. Because at the Edge, you don’t have one. No one does. Workspaces are based on your schedule: sitting desk, standing desk, work booth, meeting room, balcony seat, or “concentration room.” Wherever you go, the app knows your preferences for light and temperature, and it tweaks the environment accordingly.

Edge-exterior-day
Photographer: Ronald Tilleman

The Edge is also the ­greenest building in the world, according to British rating agency BREEAM, which gave it the highest ­sustainability score ever awarded: 98.4 percent. The Dutch have a phrase for all of this: het nieuwe werken, or roughly, the new way of working. It’s about using information technology to shape both the way we work and the spaces in which we do it. It’s about resource efficiency in the traditional sense—the solar panels create more electricity than the building uses—but it’s also about the best use of the humans.

Edge-Attrium
Photographer: Raimond Wouda

The building of the future necessitated invention. Several stand out. The super-efficient LED panels, made by Philips specifically for the Edge, require such a trickle of electricity they can be powered using the same cables that carry data for the Internet. The panels are also packed with sensors—motion, light, temperature, humidity, infrared—creating a “digital ceiling” that wires the building like synapses in a brain.

All told, the Edge is packed with some 28,000 sensors.

“We think we can be the Uber of buildings,” says Coen van Oostrom, chief executive officer of OVG Real Estate, the building’s developer. “We connect them, we make them more efficient, and in the end we will actually need fewer buildings in the world.”

Fifteen-Story Atrium

The atrium is the gravitational center of the Edge’s solar system. Mesh panels between each floor let stale office air spill into open space, where it rises and is exhaled through the roof, creating a loop of natural ventilation. Slight heat variations and air currents make it feel like the outdoors. Even on a stormy day, the building remains opalescent with natural light and angles of glass.

Edge-Attrium -2
Photographer: Raimond Wouda

The atrium and its iconic slanted roof, which looks from the outside as if a wedge has been sliced off the building, floods the workspaces with daylight and provides a sound buffer from the adjacent highway and train tracks. Every workspace is within 7 meters (23 feet) of a window.

“A quarter of this building is not allocated desk space, it’s a place to meet,” says Ron Bakker, architect of the Edge at London-based PLP Architecture. “We’re starting to notice that office space is not so much about the workspace itself; it’s really about making a working community, and for people to have a place that they want to come to, where ideas are nurtured and the future is determined.”

New Way of Working

About 2,500 Deloitte workers share 1,000 desks. The concept is called hot desking, and it’s supposed to encourage new relationships, chance interactions, and, just as important, efficient use of space. Desks are only used when they’re needed. Some tiny rooms at the Edge contain just a lounge chair and a lamp (no desk)—perfect for a phone call. There are also game rooms and coffee bars with espresso machines that remember how you like your coffee. Massive flatscreens around every corner can be synced wirelessly with any phone or laptop.

Edge-alt-seating
Photographer: Raimond Wouda

Since workers at the Edge don’t have assigned desks, lockers serve as home base for the day. Find a locker with a green light, flash your badge, and it’s yours. Employees are discouraged from keeping a single locker for days or weeks, because part of the het nieuwe werken philosophy is to break people away from their fixed locations and rigid ways of thinking.

A Dashboard to Rule Them All

Deloitte is collecting gigabytes of data on how the Edge and its employees interact. Central dashboards track everything from energy use to when the coffee machines need to be refilled. On days when fewer employees are expected, an entire section might even be shut down, cutting the costs of heating, cooling, lighting, and cleaning.

Deloitte’s general philosophy with the Edge was that anything with a return on ­investment of less than 10 years is worth a try. The digital ceiling was one of the most expensive innovations; Deloitte wouldn’t disclose the cost, but Erik Ubels, chief information officer for Deloitte in the Netherlands, says it will take 8.3 years to earn it back.

There’s no doubt, says Ubels, that in the future all buildings will be connected, both internally and to other buildings. “The multi-billion-dollar question is who is going to do it. Whoever is successful is going to be one of the most successful companies in the world.”

An Evolving App

The smartphone is your passport to the Edge. Use it to find your colleagues, adjust the heating, or manage your gym routine. You can even order up a dinner recipe, and a bag of fresh ingredients will await you when the workday is over. All desks are equipped with built-in wireless chargers so your phone can keep itself charged.

Electric Car and Bike Parking

When you arrive at the Edge, garage entry is automated. A camera snaps a photo of your license plate, matches it with your employment record, and raises the gate. Even the garage uses sensor-equipped LED lights, which brighten as you approach and dim as you leave. It’s the Netherlands, so a separate garage for bicycles and free chargers for electric vehicles aren’t surprising. In Amsterdam, even the airport taxis are Teslas.

Edge-car-bike-composite
Photographer: Raimond Wouda

Don’t worry, your boss can’t access personal data from the Edge’s sensors and has no idea how many meetings you’ve missed this year. To be sensitive of privacy concerns, Deloitte surveyed employees before it installed the license plate scanner. The vast majority of respondents thought it was fine, as long as it made work life easier.

Long Blue Tubes

The Edge is wired with a vast network of two different kinds of tubes: one that holds data (ethernet cables) and another that holds water. Behind each ceiling tile is a massive coil of thin blue piping that delivers water to and from the building’s subterranean water storage for radiant heating and cooling.

During summer months, the building pumps warm water more than 400 feet deep in the aquifer beneath the building, where it sits, insulated, until winter, when it’s sucked back out for heating. The system developed for the Edge is the most efficient aquifer thermal energy storage in the world, according to Robert van Alphen, OVG’s project manager for the Edge.

Powered by the Sun

The southern wall is a checkerboard of solar panels and windows. Thick load-bearing concrete helps regulate heat, and deeply recessed windows reduce the need for shades, despite direct exposure to the sun. The roof is also covered with panels. The ​Edge uses ​7​0 percent less electricity than ​the typical office building​, but it wasn’t until OVG installed panels on the rooftops of some neighboring university buildings that the Edge was able to boast that it produces more energy than it consumes.

Edge-solar-2

Edge-solar

Edge-Solar-Panels

Is It Hot, or Just Me?

Sensors in the LED light panels report detailed temperature and humidity readings across a floor (above). A Deloitte survey found that while fewer than a quarter of employees actively use the app’s thermostat features, three-quarters say they love it. Maybe that’s because precision controls eliminate the problem of natural hot and cold spots, often found near windows.

A coming app upgrade will boost efficiency further by suggesting desk locations to employees based on their temperature preferences and meeting locations throughout the day.

Trickle-Down Toilet Water

A massive concrete tub in the back of the parking garage gathers the rainwater used to flush the building’s toilets and water the gardens. It’s a loud room on a rainy day. The water rushes down from collection systems on the roof and outdoor balcony.

RoboCop and the Vacuum

This little robot (bottom left) comes out at night to patrol the grounds. If an alarm goes off, the camera-­equipped automaton can identify the culprit or let security know it was a false alarm. It cruises around automatically like a Roomba or can be commandeered by remote control. Deloitte’s Erik Ubels says he noticed similar robots in shipyards, tracked down the manufacturer, and asked if they could be modified for office security.

Edge-bots-composite

For smarter cleaning, activity is tracked by sensors built into light panels, so at the end of the day, the people and robots (above right) responsible for cleaning can focus on the areas that have been used most heavily that day.

Human Power

The on-site gym encourages employees to break for a midday workout. Flash your phone at the check-in station and the gym’s app automatically tracks your progress. Some of the ­exercise stations here will actually harness the energy from your workout, sending hard-earned watts back to the grid—as if you didn’t already feel like a hamster in a wheel.

Not Just a Towel Dispenser

The Edge watches you in the bathroom, too (but not in a creepy way). A normal-looking towel dispenser provides a spool of cloth for hand-drying. Unlike a typical hand dryer, though, this one is connected to the Internet. It lets the cleaning staff know when a busy bathroom is probably ready for a cleanup.

Ecological Corridor

Birds, bats, bees, and bugs. These are the building’s neighbors on the north-facing terrace. OVG worked with Amsterdam officials to establish a continuous path of vegetation that supports beneficial insects throughout the city. Birdhouses and bat boxes are tucked discreetly into the landscaping. These pockmarked towers support various species of solitary bees, which buzz about the flowers on the public terrace.

The smartest building in the world – The Edge
By Tom Randall | Sept. 23, 2015
Photographer: Raimond Wouda
Source: Deloitte

Read full article and watch a video at Bloomberg Busines: The World’s Smartest Office Building Knows How You Like Your Coffee

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Architecture Development Real Estate

Alan Faena, The Developer Behind The $550M Revival Of Miami’s Saxony Hotel to Be Called Faena House.

Faena House, Impressive 68 unit high luxury condo, featuring design by Norman Foster and located at the site of the former Saxony Hotel in Miami Beach. Image by dbox branding & creative
Faena House, Impressive 68 unit high luxury condo, featuring design by Norman Foster and located at the site of the former Saxony Hotel in Miami Beach.

Alan Faena, The Developer Behind The $550M Revival Of Miami’s Saxony Hotel to called Faena House.

The man behind one of Miami’s most ambitious real estate and architectural projects, the revival of the Saxony Hotel, finally opened up about the project. Alan Faena, the developer which counts with the support of billionaire Len Blavatnik, is set to revolutionize the Miami beachfront with the Faena Saxony, featuring the work of all-star architects Norman Foster and Rem Koolhaus.

The project has been surrounded by a shroud of mystery since day one, a mystery that characterizes Faena himself. “I’m working on one of the best projects in all of the Americas,” Faena told Forbes, “we are creating a whole district,” he added.

The $550 million project resembles what Faena did in the Buenos Aires neighborhood of Puerto Madero, where he took a set of rundown buildings and created a thriving neighborhood that counts with some of the city’s most expensive and luxurious hotels and apartments. “We don’t just develop this, we also deliver product, service, we operate, and so we give this project soul,” explained Faena.

Official details regarding the whole project have been hard to come by, but plans and renderings have been leaked. Faena House will be a 19-story, 62,000 square feet residential tower designed by starchitect Norman Foster according to the Miami Herald’s Real Deal and Hotel Chatter. “Super-celebrity-architect of mystery” Rem Koolhaas will join the project building a structure that will contain a hotel and a ballroom, retail space and a robotic garage, according to Curbed. There will also be a 300-person theater, an “intimate cabaret” and a possible re-design of the beach boardwalk at the site of the former Saxony Hotel, which at one point was slated to become a Cipriani project.

“We are creating a neighborhood here, a five block district that will include the best residential building, […] a theatre, a cultural center, and a parking garage,” Faena confirmed. What differentiates Faena’s from other mega-projects going up in Miami is that this is “the first time something so spectacular comes from the South.” Miami, he said “is our door to the North,” to which he wants to bring “a concept that has never been offered here.” Faena, as Curbed put it, “as grand conductor of his architectural orchestra, will then have built a campus of architectural fantasias.”

The Argentine developer indeed has a thing for pomp and splendor. In Buenos Aires, he developed a whole district which includes one of the city’s most eccentric and highest rated hotels with everything with a pool bar featuring a giant crown fountain and a fully white restaurant with unicorn heads lining the walls. Faena has also built several residences and an impressive cultural center. Most of his projects carry his name.

Faena’s project also fits in the bigger story of a comeback in real estate across certain states, in many cases backed by foreigners. As my colleague Morgan Brenan reported, foreigners accounted for $82.5 billion, or 8.9% of total U.S. residential real estate spend from April 2011 to March 2012. And that is up 24% from a year ago, with five states taking the majority of that investment: Florida, California, Texas, Arizona, and New York.

Home prices, according to the Case-Shiller indexes, are still about 30% below their pre-crisis levels across the country. At the same time, hot-money flows into emerging markets have inflated real estate bubbles across many major global cities. While many Chinese and Russian buyers have been looking into New York, Miami is home to the Latin Americans, with Argentines, Brazilians, and Venezuelans leading the way.

While the recovery in housing can be seen in the incredible stock prices of major homebuilders like KB Home, Lennar, and Toll Brothers, the luxury sector is also booming. And Faena is looking to take advantage of this momentum. “Our project is international, it’s open to all, we are trying to bring a new concept, a culture [to Miami],” he says.

And he may be about to make it. While he didn’t disclose anything on sales, he did hint that they are going for the top of the market. That shouldn’t surprise anyone. Given what he’s done in the past, and the caliber of the people he’s brought on board, no one should expect anything less.

Click here to visit the original post at Forbes.com
By Agustino Fontevecchia
Image by dbox branding & creative

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Architecture Development Real Estate

Hallandale approves condo king Jorge Perez’s $100 million, high-rise Beachwalk project

Hallandale Beach commissioners gave final approval Wednesday night to developer Jorge Perez’s plan to construct Beachwalk – a $100-million, 31-story hotel-residential complex on the Intracoastal Waterway.

The proposed 305-foot tower at 2600 E. Hallandale Beach Boulevard will contain 216 two-bedroom hotel-condominium suites, 84 residential units, a 1,225-square-foot restaurant and a five-story parking garage.

Commissioners also gave approval for Perez’s Related Group of Florida to spend $2.5 million to create a lush park, with a two-story restaurant and concessions, at the city’s nearby oceanfront North Beach Park.

The group will manage the facility, but the city commission said the public would still have access to the oceanfront. The term of the lease was reduced from a proposed 30-year agreement to 15 years.

In approving the project, the developer received various zoning exemptions and concessioners, including a giveway by the city of more than a third of an acre of right-of-way along portions of Diana Drive to allow for more residential units. – William Gjebre

June 7 – Hallandale Beach commissioners unanimously gave a tentative green light Wednesday night to Miami developer Jorge Perez’s plans to construct Beachwalk — a $100-million, 31-story, hotel-residential complex on the Intracoastal Waterway where the popular Manero’s restaurant once stood.

At the same time, commissioners put off until later this month a vote on a another aspect of the deal that would give Perez long-term control of a nearby prime parcel of city-owned oceanfront property to develop as a park with a restaurant.

The proposed 305-foot tower, at 2600 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd., would contain 216 two-bedroom suites that could serve as hotel rooms or condominiums, as well as an additional 84 apartments dedicated to being condominiums only. Plans include a 1,225-square foot restaurant and a five-story parking garage.

Final approvals are to be voted on June 20.

The developer, PRH-2600 Hallandale Beach LLC, is a Miami company controlled by Perez, chairman of the Related Group of Florida. If finally approved, the developer will receive various zoning exemptions and concessions, including a giveaway by the city of more than a third of an acre of right-of-way along a portion Diana Drive to allow for more residential units.

Local activist and commission candidate Csaba Kulin complained the project was too massive and that the city should not be awarding a 30-year contract for the development of the city’s one-acre oceanfront parcel.

“I’m against any giveaway of the beachfront area,” said candidate Kulin.

Kulin believes the deal would give another nearby Perez development access to the ocean and the developer control of 91 public parking spaces at the nearby residential Beach Club.

Kulin previously urged commissioners to defer the tower project because many of the residents are snowbirds and won’t be back in town until the fall.

“The problem is they are trying to shoehorn too big a building on a small site,” Kulin said.

The total site is 1.68 acres, including the land from Diana Drive.

Mayor Joy Cooper said earlier that negotiations with the developer were continuing.

“A lot of things can change,” said Cooper said, who noted that a parking shortage at the tower might not be as severe as it appears.

Cooper said she was not necessarily concerned about Perez’s group developing and managing the city’s North Beach park property, especially since he will pay for the improvements in accordance with the city’s master plan for parks. The city will be paid a percentage of the revenues from the restaurant and other concessions made available in the park, she said.

Cooper said Hallandale Beach needs new hotel space, especially at the oceanfront to attract tourists and visitors. The restaurant in the park will provide a wonderful oceanfront setting for dinners, she added.

Commissioner Keith London, who is running against Cooper, agreed.

“There is a need for quality hotel space in Hallandale.”

Perez, known as Miami’s “condo king,” did not appear at Wednesday’s meeting to talk about Beachwalk.

His Fort Lauderdale attorney, Debbie Orshefky of Greenberg Traurig, told commissioners, “We are confident that it will be successful.”

London and other commissioners hope to extract some concessions before the final vote, including a pledge from the developer that the beach park project will be completed first. Another request: regular monitoring of parking around the facility.

Residents who spoke at the meeting were equally divided on both sides of the project.

City staff endorsed the project. London, however, said he wasn’t happy that it took nearly two years to reach the commission, and that some agreements between the city and developer were incomplete.

City documents say the developer has vowed to spend up to $2.5 million to reshape the rundown North Beach park area with a two-story, 4,000-square foot structure to include the restaurant, restrooms and changing facilities for both beach goers and diners. There would be an additional 3,000 square feet of patio area facing the ocean.

Plans for the full-service restaurant call for indoor seating for 80 persons and outdoor seating for 100. Patrons could rent beach chairs, umbrellas, paddle boards and canoes. A volleyball area is planned.

For the first 10 years of the 30-year lease, the city would collect a minimum of $5,000 a month or 2.5% of gross park concession receipts, whichever is greater. The percentage would go up a notch to 3% in years 11 through 20, and rise another half-percent to 3.5% from years 21-30.

The concessionaire would pay all operating and maintenance for the park facility, and also give the city $200,000 to maintain other city parks.

Prior to issuance of the first building permit for the high-rise tower, the developer would give the city another $550,000 — $250,000 to be used for public improvements and $300,000 for improvements to affordable housing.

By William Gjebre, BrowardBulldog.org
William Gjebre can be reached at wgjebre@browardbulldog.org
Hallandale approves condo king Jorge Perez’s $100 million, high-rise Beachwalk project

Click below to learn more about Beachwalk by Pininfarina

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Architecture Development Projects Real Estate

Jorge Perez’s One Ocean is an architect, artist playground

One Ocean South Beach
Located at 1 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach, FL 33139

One Ocean

Seeking to cement his “legacy” in Miami Beach, developer Jorge Perez has recruited Enrique Norten of Mexico’s TEN Arquitectos and landscape architect Enzo Enea, creator of Switzerland’s Tree Museum, to collaborate on the design of the ultra-luxury One Ocean condo project.

Enea, known for creating the world’s only Tree Museum in Switzerland, works with Norten to envision a gorgeous mixture of living spaces, nature and art,” according to The Related Group statement announcing the project.

Perez also plans to incorporate into the property the artistic work of modern Latin American artists such as Jose Bedia, Eugenio Cuttica, Michelle Oka Doner and Daniel Azouley.

“We have built over 80,000 units thus far. One Ocean is my legacy for Miami Beach,” Perez, the chairman and CEO of The Related Group, said in a statement.

Perez’s connection to art is well known: not only is he a collector of the work of modern Latin American artists, but he has given a donation to the Miami Art Museum of art and cash totaling $40 million. As a result, the new museum, now under construction, is going to be called the Jorge M. Perez Art Museum of Miami-Dade County.

In addition to 46 residences, the project will have four villas. Typical residences will have about 3,000 square feet of space, and would include private elevators, underground parking, beach club membership, a gym and a pool, according to a statement from the company. Some residences will also feature rooftop spas and solariums designed by Enea, as well as front and back terraces.
Enea will apply his aesthetic to a range of areas from the private gardens, to the park and common areas at the 1 Collins Ave.

“Our vision was to design outdoor spaces that create a consistent language among the unique architectural elements of One Ocean,” Enea said. “This language is used throughout the entire site, providing lush private gardens, luxurious pool top cabanas, and elegant rooftop terraces with Miami’s aqua blue waters as their backdrop.”

Perez has told the Business Journal that every project is an opportunity to incorporate art into his work through design, architecture and the installation of art pieces on site. He provided his Top Ten South Florida project, in his own words, to the Business Journal.

One Ocean is part of a big push by The Related Group to grow its condo development division as part of an overall plan to diversify the company.

Related has several other condo projects either under construction including Millecento in the Brickell area of downtown Miami. Perez’s previous projects near One Ocean include Apogee Miami Beach and Murano at Portofino. Sales for One Ocean are handled by Related Realty and Fortune International. The sales center, located at 91 Collins Ave., is set to open in time for Miami Art Week and Art Basel.

By Oscar Pedro Musibay
South Florida Business Journal

Click here for more information about this amazing project.

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Architecture Development Real Estate

Spanish firm proposes major development next to Arsht Center

The company is looking to build a 12-story office and retail building, then add a 650-foot tall tower. The project goes next to Miami’s planning and zoning board.

By Bill Cobb
A Spanish firm has unveiled a five-year plan for an ambitious commercial and residential project on Biscayne Boulevard near the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts that supporters say will restart the stalled transformation of the long-dormant, dog-eared corridor into the vibrant, pedestrian-oriented urban district envisioned when the performing arts complex opened in 2006.

The $412 million proposal by Espacio USA, the subsidiary of a big Spanish developer that purchased most of the 1400 block of Biscayne last year, calls for a 12-story office and retail building to start construction early next year on the corner of Northeast 14th Street, facing the Arsht Center’s opera house. It would be joined later by a separate 650-foot-tall residential, office and retail tower. A tree-shaded public plaza would split the block at a diagonal between the two new buildings.

The 1400 Biscayne project, which goes to Miami’s planning and zoning board for a vote Wednesday evening, would replace a far larger, twin-tower project that had been approved for the site during the downtown condo boom six years ago but, like several other major developments in the immediate vicinity, fell victim to the subsequent real-estate collapse. Some critics feared the previous development’s mass would have overshadowed the opera house.

Espacio is seeking a major modification of that existing development permit, which is still valid, for what is a completely different development, this one designed by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners. The firm, founded by famed retired architect I.M. Pei, was also responsible for the signature Miami Tower, built in 1987 as the CenTrust Tower. Supporters say the new design is far more simpatico than its predecessor to the Arsht Center and the neighborhood.

“The times have changed, and we didn’t want to take away views or impact the area heavily,’’ said Espacio USA CEO Alberto Muñoz. “We wanted something sustainable that did not overwhelm the city.”

Arsht Center administrators, who are warily awaiting plans from casino giant Genting, which bought the Miami Herald and Omni buildings nearby, have welcomed the Espacio proposal, a spokesman said.

The proposal would place the 12-story tower at an angle to the opera house’s black-box theater and Biscayne, allowing the arts building to remain visible from up the boulevard. The 55-story tower would also angle back from the street. By placing the 10-story garage at the rear, the architects avoided the usual Miami parking pedestal effect, so that the tower comes all the way down to the street, creating a more pedestrian-friendly ambience.

Ground floors of both buildings would have commercial space to provide pedestrian life on the street. The garage would also be lined with usable space on Northeast Second Avenue to avoid the blank-wall, back-of-the house syndrome that deadens some downtown streets.

The complex would begin to provide Arsht Center patrons with amenities like restaurants and structured parking that have been lacking in the vicinity, backers say.

“It continues the growth and urbanization of downtown,’’ said Alyce Robertson, executive director of the city’s Downtown Development Authority. “It will bring more life into that area around the Arsht Center and add to the vitality north of Interstate 395, which has been like an invisible line separating the Omni from everything that’s going on downtown.’’

The DDA does have some quibbles. Among them: The last version of the blueprint its planners saw had a retaining wall all along the Biscayne Boulevard frontage, which could discourage the very pedestrian traffic the city wants to encourage. Because the project is using a development permit approved under the old city code, it doesn’t have to adhere to the new, more pedestrian-friendly Miami 21 code.

“We’re hoping they address this,’’ Robertson said. “We want to make it an easy transition for pedestrians from sidewalk to commercial space. It’s better for them. We want them to be incredibly successful.’’

The developer said Tuesday its architects added stairs and lowered 40 percent of the retail space to street level to deal with the DDA’s concerns.

Espacio purchased an existing office building and parking garage that take up about two-thirds of the block for more than $32 million, and later added a small apartment building that houses the Manhattan and DRB cafes on the ground floor. Espacio does not own the southwest corner parking lot.

The project, which requires city commission approval, would be built in two phases, Muñoz said. Demolition of the apartment house and the corner structure would allow the company to start construction of the 12-story building while retaining most of its existing tenants. Once that building is done, Espacio hopes its tenants, which include the Spanish cultural center the firm lured to the office building, will move into the new commercial space as the remaining buildings on the property, including the old garage, are torn down to make way for the residential tower.

The idea, Muñoz said, is to create synergy between officer workers, residents, visitors and Arsht Center patrons and get them circulating through the area.

“We think the Biscayne corridor has real strength. But right now, if you go to the Arsht Center and want to have a beer or eat something, you have to get in your car,” he said. “We want people to enjoy the city on foot. It’s already happening. But we want to extend that by animating the area.”

Source: http://www.miamiherald.com
Picture by Bill Cobb